Block Captain Application

January 16, 2018 in Current News

The following post is from: Safety & Security

Apply to be a block captain today! Simply download and fill out the attached form and email it to Or, you can print it off and either mail it to us or drop it off at 4400 Chouteau Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110. We’re always looking for more people to help us make communities better.

Block Captain Flyer Fill Out

Block Captain Flyer


January 10, 2018 in Crime Tips, internet, passwords, websites

The following post is from: Safety & Security

How long has it been since you changed your passwords?

Unless you work in an industry where cyber security is a top priority, the typical person should change their passwords every 180 days or about twice a year.

Why should I change my passwords?

The internet has become a hub for just about everything. You can stay in contact with friends and family, exchange information with coworkers and employers, order electronics, buy groceries, and more. Websites most people use include Facebook, Amazon, and Netflix. All of these websites store personal information, such as full names, home and workplace addresses, phone numbers, and bank account information. Leaving this information vulnerable online can leave you vulnerable.

What is a good password?

A good password is a mixture of a bunch of variables. You need to be able to remember it or store it somewhere safe. Safe locations to store a password include written on paper in a locked drawer or secure location, a password vault app, and an encrypted file. It is not safe to store passwords on your computer in a text document, on a sticky note by your computer, or a digital notepad on your phone.

A good password is not a word or phrase you use frequently, shorter than 8 characters (letters, numbers, or symbols), and all the same capitalization. Do not include the word “password” in your password. Good passwords have 8 or more characters, and are a mixture of capital letters, lower case letters, numbers, and symbols.

You can also make your password numerous words long if words are easier for you to remember than a stream of characters. If you have trouble coming up with a new, unique password, simply search for a “strong password generator” on your preferred search engine. There are many free websites that will provide you with a random selection of characters.

Here are some examples of a good password:

  • mr4AX9ZjAq
  • #XuxmQv9F9
  • *Wolf1Confuse2Division3House4!
  • TokyoJack#Skype@56

Notice that some of these password examples are gibberish and others contain English. If you know a second language, you can use a combination of English and non-English words or only use non-English. If you use non-English, it’s still important to use a variety of characters.

Child Security

October 5, 2017 in children, crime, Crime Tips, Current News, Kids, kit, security

The following post is from: Safety & Security

Child Safety & Security Classes

Is your child starting to be old enough to be left at home alone or with a sibling? Are they using the internet alone? The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children offers free online training for kids aged 5-17 on home alone safety, internet identity safety, and cyberbullying. Their website is and they have materials for both kids and parents.

DIY Child ID Kit

Although it is not something you would ever want to have to use, a child ID kit is essential if you ever need law enforcement’s help finding your child. It is also a great tool to have when traveling far distances or if you live in a natural disaster area. Here’s what you need to make one at home:

  • Photo of the child’s face, in color, that has been taken in the last 6 months
    • The photo should be updated regularly, about twice a year
    • You should keep a physical copy on hand as well as a digit copy on a phone or computer that you can easily access
  • Create a description of your child and include their name, nickname, birthday, gender, hair color & style, eye color, weight, height, and any identifying qualities. Identifying qualities can include if they wear glasses, have braces, piercings, and birthmarks.
  • A copy of your child’s fingerprints
    • Grab some fingerprint ink from an office supply store
    • Have your child thoroughly wash their hands and fingertips
    • Roll their finger across the ink pad and then roll their finger across plain cardstock or paper, using firm and even pressure
    • The print should show lines and swirls clearly. If there are smudges, try again
    • Keep these prints somewhere secure. Do not give to anyone (including law enforcement) unless it is an emergency
  • A sample of DNA
    • There are services that you can use to collect and store your child’s DNA in case of an emergency, or you can do one of the following:
      • Have your child use a new toothbrush without toothpaste. Do not rinse it off. Let it air dry and then store it in a brown envelope. Use a self-sealing envelope or have your child lick to seal the envelope, and then store it in a cool, dry location
      • Follow the above instructions but instead have your child exclusively use a new hairbrush for a month. Store it with the hair in the brush
      • Collect a used bandage with a blood sample on it from your child and store it in a brown envelope in a cool, dry place
    • Dental Impressions
      • You can use a clean piece of Styrofoam to collect bite marks from your child. Have them bit down firmly on Styrofoam, so that you can clearly see their tooth impressions. Store somewhere safe, and update every two years until they are 18
    • Medical Reports
      • Keep copies of x-rays, dental records, and documentations of broken bones somewhere safe and accessible

If you can only do a couple of these things, the photograph, description, and DNA sample are the most important things to keep.

Fireworks Day Safety Tips

June 29, 2017 in Current News

The following post is from: Safety & Security

It is ILLEGAL and DANGEROUS to set off fireworks in St. Louis City limits (ordinance 65824). If you go somewhere outside of the city to set off fireworks, remember these tips:

  • Obey all local laws regarding the use of fireworks.
  • Know your fireworks; read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting.
  • A responsible adult SHOULD supervise all firework activities.  Never give fireworks to children.
  • Alcohol and fireworks do not mix.  Save your alcohol for after the show.
  • Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks.
  • Light one firework at a time and then quickly move away.
  • Use fireworks OUTDOORS in a clear area; away from buildings and vehicles.
  • Never relight a “dud” firework.  Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water.
  • Always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby.
  • Never carry fireworks in your POCKET or shoot them into METAL or GLASS containers.
  • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks.
  • Dispose of spent fireworks by wetting them down and place in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials until the next day.
  • FAA regulations PROHIBIT the possession and transportation of fireworks in your checked baggage or carry-on luggage.
  • Report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department.

And let’s not forget the safety of our pets!

  • Don’t bring your pets to a fireworks display, even a small one.
  • If fireworks are being used near your home, put your pet in a safe, interior room to avoid exposure to the sound.
  • Make sure your pet has an identification tag, in case it runs off during a fireworks display.
  • Never shoot fireworks of any kind (consumer fireworks, sparklers, fountains, etc.) near pets.


Visit this website to see what professional firework shows will be happening this Fourth of July:

This information was originally posted on


Abby Orscheln – Safety and Security Intern

What to do if you are in a fender bender

June 16, 2017 in car accident, Current News, fender bender, insurance, Missouri, st louis

The following post is from: Safety & Security

It can be scary if you are in an accident, serious or minor. If you haven’t been in one before, it can be a bit confusing to know what to do. Here are 7 tips for what to do in this situation.

  1. Check on yourself and your passengers. If someone is hurt, calling 911 should be your first priority.
  2. Check your surroundings, is it safe to stay where you are? Or should you move to a side street or shoulder on the road?
  3. Once you are in a safe place and if everyone in your car is okay, you should check on anyone else what was involved. But, it is important to not admit guilt or say “sorry”. It is possible the other car involved is trying to commit insurance fraud, and saying “sorry” could be used as an admission of guilt. Just ask, “are you okay?”
  4. Once everyone is checked on, get the other driver’s info. Get their license number, phone number, and insurance information. Get info of witnesses as well. You will also need to give your insurance information, which should be on your insurance card.
  5. Call your insurance company. They will advise you if you should call the police. In Missouri, there are two types of accidents where you are required to call the police (within 30 days of the accident).
    1. If one of the motorists in the accident was uninsured.
    2. If there was a death or injury or more than $500 worth of damage.
  6. Take LOTS of pictures and notes. Take pictures of both cars from all angles, write down the time and place of the accident.
  7. Continue to monitor your condition. Adrenaline rushes can mask symptoms, so keep an eye on yourself and visit your doctor if you don’t feel well.


If you are unsure what to do, calling your insurance company can be a big help. Drive safe!


Abby Orscheln – Safety & Security Intern